Uae community dating

The seasonal movements of these groups led to not only frequent clashes between groups but also the establishment of seasonal and semi-seasonal settlements and centres.

These formed tribal groupings whose names are still carried by modern Emiratis, including the Bani Yas and Al Bu Falah of Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Liwa and the Al Bahrain coast, the Dhawahir, Awamir, Al Ali and Manasir of the interior, the Sharqiyin of the east coast and the Qawasim to the North.

This contact persisted and became wide-ranging, probably motivated by the trade in copper from the Hajar Mountains, which commenced around 3000 BCE.

There are six major periods of human settlement with distinctive behaviours in the pre-Islamic UAE: the Hafit period from 3200-2600 BCE; the Umm Al Nar culture spanned from 2600-2000 BCE, the Wadi Suq people dominated from 2000-1300 BCE.

This led to a group of rulers travelling to Medina, converting to Islam and subsequently driving a successful uprising against the unpopular Sassanids, who dominated the Northern coasts at the time.

Following the death of Muhammad, the new Islamic communities south of the Persian Gulf threatened to disintegrate, with insurrections against the Muslim leaders.

Each emirate is governed by an absolute monarch; together, they jointly form the Federal Supreme Council.

There is no proof of contact with the outside world at that stage, although in time lively trading links developed with civilisations in Mesopotamia, Iran and India's Harappan culture.

Six emirates joined the UAE in 1971, the seventh, Ras al-Khaimah, joined the federation in 1972.

Islam is the official religion and Arabic is the official language of the UAE.

From 1200 BC to the advent of Islam in Eastern Arabia, through three distinctive iron ages (Iron age 1, 1200-1000 BC; Iron age 2, 1000-600 BC and Iron age 3 600-300 BC) and the Mleiha period (300 BC onward), the area was variously occupied by Archaemenid and other forces and saw the construction of fortified settlements and extensive husbandry thanks to the development of the falaj irrigation system.

In ancient times, Al Hasa (today's Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia) was part of Al Bahreyn and adjoined Greater Oman (today's UAE and Oman).

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